The International Steam Pages


Sugar Railways on Negros, February 2007

James Waite reports on a FarRail visit:

"God bless our trip". So read the message in the cab of one of the manriders on the 3ft gauge railway at La Carlota, on the western side of Negros in the Philippines. It looked quite at home in this devoutly Christian country. Back in the 1970's many railfans made the long journey there to visit what had become something of a railway wonderland, famed as the home of some of the last working Shays, a Mallet, and a host of more conventional steam locos toiling away amongst the cane fields and forests of this beautiful island. It's several years now since any steam loco ran there regularly. I thought I had left a visit too late and was glad when Bernd Seiler's FarRail Tours decided to attempt another visit in 2007 working around the two sugar mills which still had at least potentially active steam locos.

There's a joke in the Philippines that a visitor from Spain once asked if the Filipinos had a word for maņana. "Yes", came the reply, "but it doesn't convey quite the same sense of urgency." Bernd had started planning this trip many months ago and made a preliminary visit to the island in April 2006, nine months earlier. It's fair to say that the laid back way of life there caused him more than his fair share of headaches during the planning stage, with considerable doubts about haw many locos would actually run. In the event the trip was a great success. Even the sun shone at all the important times. God was definitely smiling on us!

A little history

Sugar production on a small scale began in the Philippines soon after the Spanish established their colony there in the late 1500's. Late in 1898 the USA went to war against Spain, ostensibly to drive the Spanish out of Cuba as a part of the Monroe Doctrine, their policy that no colonial power should operate in America. The Americans invaded the Philippines almost at once and Spain capitulated. The war ended with the curious result that the USA, the land of the free, set up their first overseas colony in the Philippines, thousands of miles from home.

Records are scanty for much of the history of the sugar industry in the islands but it seems clear that the first railways were built towards the end of the nineteenth century. Probably these were short lines between the local mills and the fields which immediately surrounded them and would have been powered not by locomotives but by the ubiquitous Asian ox or water buffalo, known in the Philippines as the carabao. As in Cuba the real spur to the development of the sugar railways was the building of the large, fully mechanised central mills in the place of the old local factories. Cane was brought in from as far as twenty miles away and there was an obvious need for railways for its transport. Many of the new mills also transported their finished product by rail to private wharfs on the coast from where it was shipped away from the island. The first central opened in 1912 at San Carlos in the north east of the island. In the early 1920's several more centrals were built, mostly in the plains of the north west. Each had its own railway system, many of them of considerable length. Most adopted the 3ft gauge which the Americans had already brought with them from Colorado to the sugar estates of Hawaii.

At much the same time several logging firms set up business in the Philippines. The largest of them, the Insular Lumber Company, fondly known as ILCO in the Philippines, set up a sawmill at Fabrica in the north of the island and built a 3ft 6ins gauge line from there up into the mountains. This was a true all-American operation using several three truck Shays and a magnificent Baldwin-built 0-6-6-0 Mallet. Their railway's history later became entwined with the sugar business in that part of the island. More of this later.

Labour relations between the mill owners, the cane farmers and their workers deteriorated throughout the 20's and 30's, leaving a legacy of social problems and hardship which persist to this day. Business was booming but there was a general perception that the absentee mill owners made enormous profits at the expense of the farmers and even more so their labourers, many of whom lived barely at subsistence level . 

Little had been done to address the problems before the Second World War when the islands were occupied by Japan. Cut off from their American markets and owners the centrals faced an uncertain future. Some of the plant was adapted by the Japanese to make fuel from alcohol, a by-product of sugar milling, for their war equipment. Negros was the scene of sustained resistance activity throughout the Japanese occupation, much of it well organised. The leaders adopted a policy of not attacking the centrals because of the important role they would play in getting the economy back on its feet after the war. However some attacks were still mounted, probably caused as much by resentment of the pre-war labour policies as hatred of the Japanese. Further damage was done by the retreating Japanese at the end of the war. Several centrals never reopened. Others merged and their railways were linked to the adjoining systems. In the 50's and 60's it would, in theory, have been possible to travel by train from Silay in the north all the way to Kabankalan in the south, over lines belonging to six different concerns.

In the late 1960's the notorious President Marcos encouraged a rapid expansion of the Negros sugar industry and several more centrals were built. Two of them involved rail transport. One, the Southern Negros Development Corporation or SONEDCO, built an extensive 3ft gauge system south of Kabankalan using Japanese-built diesels, opening in 1971. Up in Fabrica ILCO had pretty well run out of timber to cut. Much of the land it vacated was given over to cane growing. The Lopez Sugar Corporation had a mill in the town just across the river from the ILCO sawmill from where they ran a 3ft gauge system serving the cane fields to the east. They built a new 3ft 6ins gauge line connecting their mill to the ILCO system to bring in cane from the new fields and laid mixed gauge track within the mill yard. Later on disputes about rates arose between the farmers and Lopez. In the late 1960's the farmers set up a co-operative under the Marcos initiative to build a new mill, Sagay Central, at Bato on the old ILCO line and the connection to Lopez was removed.

Sadly the good years in the sugar industry were about to come to an end. By the mid-80's the world sugar price was in rapid decline. Many of the mills have closed. On the east coast of the island only Bais central still ran a railway in 2007. In the north Sagay central still used one diesel loco for cane unloading with the mill. Lopez flourishes but has closed its railway, as has Victorias, its neighbour to the west which used to run a magnificent 600mm gauge system, and SONEDCO to the south. On the west coast only Hawaiian-Philippine at Silay, La Carlota and BISCOM at Binalbagan still operate railways and even there lines are being cut back. Probably it is only a matter of time before the railways of Negros become things of the past.

Locomotives

With most of the older centrals opening in the early 1920's it was fortunate that they all started their rail operations with steam. By the end of the decade internal combustion locos were making serious inroads into the American market and had started to arrive in Negros. The major player in the i/c market was Plymouth. Baldwin, which had supplied the majority of steam locos to the island, chose not to compete with them at that time, an odd decision as they had developed reliable petrol and diesel locos for the military narrow gauge during the later years of the First World War. During the inter-war period most of the i/c locos were alcohol mechanicals, cheap to run using the alcohol produced during the milling process. In the 50's and early 60's diesel-engined locos were supplied from the USA, both from Plymouth and other builders until the Japanese entered the market later in the 60's with a more primitive but substantially cheaper product.

Most of the steam locos burned bagasse. This, of course, came free of charge but wasn't always the most economical fuel as extra manpower was needed on the locos to bring the bagasse forward to the cab. Two of the centrals, La Carlota and Victorias, converted their locos to burn fuel oil, more expensive to buy but less labour intensive. The rise in oil prices in the 70's and 80's probably sealed the fate of many of the surviving steam locos. Hawaiian-Philippine, which had always used bagasse, became the last mill to run steam in regular service but even there steam was confined to shunting within the mill by the end of the century. In 2003 they advertised most of their locos for sale.

Bais and San Carlos

I joined the group for its second week when the visits to Hawaiian-Philippine and to La Carlota, the two mills with working steam locos, were due to take place. On my way I made a brief stop at Manila to visit two plinthed locos at Tutuban, the terminus of the Philippine National Railways, the 3ft 6ins gauge state system. The group had called there the previous week and made a visit to the PNR works.

Moving on to Negros the group first visited Bais central in the south east of the island. There's quite an extensive 3ft gauge system still in use, entirely diesel worked but with one plinthed Baldwin 0-6-0 and a second dumped steam loco. One interesting feature of the Bais operation is that they still run trains of tank cars to transport molasses to their private wharf at Luka for loading onto ships, the last mill on Negros to send out its product in this traditional way. The next call was at San Carlos, the oldest central on the island which closed in the late 1990's after their bank called in their loans. Two of their 3ft locos are preserved and others are stored. San Carlos is now to be the site of a new operation to manufacture biofuel from sugar cane. There's a suggestion that some of the old milling equipment here together with two more of the locos may find a new home at a sugar railway museum being planned at Lopez central at Fabrica. Let's hope they don't just get scrapped when the old mill site is cleared.

Moving on to the north of the island the group called at Sagay City, Sagay central, Lopez, the home of the last Negros Shays and Victorias. More of these anon. After a long journey they finally arrived at the Royal Am Rei Hotel in Bacolod City which was to be the base for the following few days.

Hawaiian-Philippine

The next day saw the group's first visit to Hawaiian-Philippine, well known amongst enthusiasts for many years for its fleet of beautiful sky blue locos. Two have been more or less in working order in recent years. One of them, no. 5, had become run down and was not allowed out of the yard. The other, no. 7, was in much better condition but had lost its famous blue colour scheme at the behest of the current management. It didn't look half as good in black! Various promises over the months that no. 5 would be overhauled and back in action for the tour ended up with a repair contract being placed on the very day that the group arrived. The job was due to take ten days, by which time we would all be back home. Definitely a case of a few maņanas too many! The morning began early with a journey with no. 7 to loading point 78 at San Diego, to the east of the mill returning by about 9.30am. The remainder of the morning passed with a visit to the unserviceable locos while Bernd played his trump card - he would pay for no. 7 to be repainted blue in time for the next visit three days later, but only after she had taken the group out into the fields again that afternoon. No. 7 duly performed in all her black splendour and for once the cloud and sporadic rain that had characterised the trip from the start gave way to crisp afternoon sunshine. Yes, God was smiling today!

Diesel day at La Carlota

The next day saw the first of three visits to La Carlota, some thirty miles or so south of Bacolod. No working steam today. The main object of the visit was to iron out any bugs over the steam runs later in the week and to make sure all would go as planned. In the afternoon there would be a diesel ride out into the fields. We found our first loco sooner than we had expected. We were bowling along at surprising speed over the newly rebuilt road into town when we came across Baldwin 0-6-0T+T no 105 on a plinth at the city boundary. Plainly she had only just been installed and workmen were still making good the ground around the plinth. Further on we found Porter 0-4-0T+T no. 4 preserved at the mill entrance. This was a Sunday and not much was moving, partly because the "modern" 1970's plant in the mill had broken down and only the 1920's steam driven machinery was still working. The diesel shed contained a goodly complement of Plymouth and Japanese machines. No. 106 sat nearby, a Baldwin dating from 1926 and now the only working steam loco. Over the other side of the yard lay another nine steam locos in varying condition from the almost OK to seriously reverting to nature to just a frame and boiler.

Late in the morning the sun began to come through - yes, it looked as though God was on our side again! Bernd had arranged a tour of the mill and it was a joy to find three stationary steam engines hard at work while the more modern machinery stood idle, surrounded by engineers with long faces. The generally unkempt state of the plant, typified by the asbestos fibres wafting in the breeze from the remains of what had once been boiler lagging, did nothing to inspire confidence in the wholesomeness of its product. Back outside it was time for lunch in the town and a few welcome bottles of San Miguel. Funny how many countries with Spanish connections serve San Miguel. Is it really all brewed by the same concern or is it just that they like the name?!

Plymouth diesel no. 6 and a train of cane empties awaited us on our return to the mill and we set off along the Elena branch to the north west. As with all trains here we were followed by a manrider with a crew and gear ready to deal with any derailments. The light just got better and better as the journey went on. At the terminus the entire village seemed to have turned out to welcome us while our empties were shunted and a return train of loaded wagons made ready. We rejoined our bus a short distance down the line for the trip back to Bacolod, calling in on the way at the old Ma-Ao central a short distance to the north. Steam locos had been in store here relatively recently but nothing was left now.

Plinthed locos - Shays and the Philippines Mallet

Monday began with a tour of three plinthed locos at Bacolod. First we visited La Herencia Negrense at Mandalagan where an 0-6-0ST is preserved at a roundabout on the Circumferential Road or bypass on the edge of town. Precise particulars of this loco are unknown though it may be Baldwin works number 36230 of 1911 and have come from Bais. Next we called at the remains of Bacolod Murcia mill east of the town where an 0-6-0T+T now numbered 7 (though it may once have been no. 6) has been preserved for many years. Bacolod Murcia was a sad sight. The main mill building had been entirely demolished and only a wooden office building was still in use. Our last call was at the La Carlota Pavilion at the Panaad Park and Sports Complex at Mansilingan. Here La Carlota 0-6-2T+T no 108 forms the centrepiece of a small display about the sugar industry of Negros.

The rest of the day was to be a non-steam visit to Hawaiian-Philippine. Three of us opted out of this and took a trip around the north coast as far as Sagay to see the plinthed locos on the way without the rain which had marred the previous visit there. Jayme, our driver, was a most interesting and thoughtful person who had recently retired after a lifetime of work as a bank inspector. His job had been to oversee the loan accounts for the sugar companies, planters and farmers and make sure they weren't "pole-vaulting" as he put it, i.e., selling their product on the side without paying the bank its dues. He possessed an encyclopaedic knowledge of the workings of the sugar business and gave us many fascinating insights into how it operated, with such things as the expected yield from each landholding given climatic variations from year to year and some of the devices the planters used to get the better of the bank 

On the outskirts of Bacolod we passed the site of Talisay Silay central, once the home of some attractive side tank locos but now closed and entirely demolished. Our first call was at Victorias where the 600mm gauge system closed in the early 2000's. We explored the mill site thoroughly but there was no sign of any of their Henschel steam locos, nor their diesels. We were told that several survived until recently but have now have been scrapped. Almost all traces of the extensive system within the mill yard had been removed. The only surviving loco is Baldwin 0-8-0 no. 13B which has resided on a plinth at the mill for many years. Happily their two Bagnall 0-4-4T's which had started life on a tramway in Hong Kong have now returned there for preservation. We were also taken to the church of Christ the Worker inside the mill complex which is a local tourist attraction on account of an extraordinary wall painting which dominates the building. Known as the "Angry Christ" it's a disturbingly ferocious painting by a Belgian artist dating from 1946 and apparently inspired by the hostile relationship of the time between the mill owners and their workers. God doesn't look like a benign figure here. Better to keep on the right side of him! In 2013 comes news that a Maffei loco (minus its boiler) has been discovered and has moved to the Frankfurter Feldbahn museum which intends to restore it to full working order.

Next stop was Lopez central at Fabrica. The Lopez 3ft gauge system was dieselised many years ago but has now closed. When the 3ft 6ins connection to the ILCO system was built Lopez bought two of their three truck shays to work it. They became Lopez no's 9 and 10. After the connection was closed Lopez had no further use for the 3ft 6ins gauge and converted the Shays to work on their 3ft gauge system. Happily both survived and have been cosmetically restored.

The sun was what might be called half out here - just enough to make a bright picture but not so harsh as to lose all the shadow detail in the midday sun. Evidently God understands the needs of the steam photographer! No. 10 started life as a standard gauge loco in Missouri, USA. She arrived in the Philippines, probably in the 1920's, and was converted to Insular Lumber's 3ft 6ins gauge. She became the last working steam loco at Lopez, finally expiring in the late 1980's or early 1990's, and now makes a fine sight as a 3ft gauge engine on display beside the main road at the mill gate. No. 9 is preserved inside the mill yard on a plinth which is high enough for her to be visible from outside. She had plainly deteriorated during her years out of use, with several parts missing, but what's left has been well restored cosmetically. The yard itself was piled high with old rail, some of which was being laid out as what appeared to be reinforcing bars for the concrete floor of a new construction project. We were told that the manager of the mill is a railfan and that this was to become the new railway museum mentioned earlier. The building would be much too large just to display their two Shays, though if the San Carlos locos find their way there, and if maybe some of the other less cared-for locos on the island could also be rescued it would have the makings of a really exciting project.

It was only a short distance from Lopez to Sagay City where ILCO's 0-6-6-0 Mallet no. 7 (Baldwin works number 58239 of1925) is now preserved in the town's plaza. Back in the 1970's this loco and ILCO's three Shays were amongst of the highlights of a Philippines visit. In 1978 ILCO ran out of trees to cut. They closed down their Fabrica operation and relocated to a new site in the south of the island, taking one of their Shays with them. The other two, along with no. 7. were dumped alongside the new Sagay Central mill at Bato, apparently in the hope that the sugar company might want to buy them. This never happened as Sagay Central used Hitachi diesels from the start. The locos appear to have remained intact until the late 1990's. In 1998 a local resident purchased no. 7 for preservation and presented her to the city council for display. At Sagay Jayme took us to a small, unpretentious restaurant in the back streets run by one of his friends. The squid fry-up here was the culinary highlight of the entire tour. Sheer delight!

On the way back we called at Laguay, where the harbour branch of Hawaiian-Philippine crosses the main coast road. Loco working stopped here many years ago on account of the poor state of the track. Even while the locos still ran a local co-operative had started up a pedal car service on the branch as far as Mambag-Id, an isolated village near the old wharf. We counted twenty three cars or "vagonetas" as the locals call them The going rate for a return trip was 50 pesos per car, about 60p. Scant reward for the driver for well over an hour's hard work, especially in the harsh tropical sun though it was raining by the time we arrived. Why was this?! Perhaps God doesn't rate pedal cars, or maybe His photographic sense told Him that the ladies' multi-coloured umbrellas would brighten up what was otherwise a drab grey scene.

Next day was one of the highlights of the trip - two runs over the Hawaiian-Philippines system with no. 7 in its new blue livery. We arrived at the mill soon after dawn in what looked like distinctly threatening weather. What a great job the painters had done! The loco was positively glowing and the sweet smell of burning bagasse wafted from her Rushton Improved Stack, Radley & Hunter Type as we were told it was - that's a balloon chimney to the rest of us! The first trip was to collect a cane train at loading point 78 at San Diego, a couple of miles to the east. We all clambered on board the tender, finding places to sit amongst the bagasse. Yes, you've guessed it, as the loco backed onto the loaded train at San Diego the sun broke through the early morning cloud - a beautiful sight with the storm clouds as a backdrop. Yes, God must really know something about photography! No. 7 propelled the train back to the mill, a little unorthodox but this meant the loco was facing into the morning sun. Several photo stops later we reached the mill mid-morning. There were several hours to fill before the afternoon run - time for another trip on the pedal cars before settling in for a lengthy lunch.

Back at the mill No. 7 posed again close to no. 5 in beautiful afternoon sunshine before getting ready for its run to Adela, in the south west of the system, with a train of empties. Once across the main coast road she swapped the empties for a loaded train. The weight of these taxed the little loco, with much slipping as she clawed her way along the line. By the time she had reached the terminus it was nearly sunset. Many photos later we set off back for the mill in the gathering darkness. By the time we arrived heavy rain had set in. Had God not noticed that some of us had brought our tripods for some night shots? Or maybe He just figured he'd done enough for one day. So, night shots were off and we headed back for supper at Bacolod, this time at the Vienna Kaffehaus - run by an Austrian family who served a very respectable schnitzel!

Steam at La Carlota

We spent the next two days at La Carlota with runs on the main line to the south east, ending at Velez Malaga, almost in the shadow of Mount Kanlaon, a spectacularly shaped volcano at the heart of a national park and the highest mountain in the central Philippines. This is a most scenic line, with rolling hills interrupted by girder bridges over the mountain streams, all with the mountain as the backdrop. La Carlota's locos are black, and no. 106's condition could be politely described as work-stained - quite a contrast to the beautiful blue loco the previous day. This loco is still oil fired, unlike some of La Carlota's other locos which reverted to bagasse firing towards the end of their working careers, and produced copious amounts of black smoke during its runpasts. We made a lengthy stop at Ana Maria, a sizeable depot with a yard, station buildings and the remains of an engine shed close to La Castellana city. Here the local fire brigade turned up to water the engine. We reached the terminus ay Velez Malaga before mid-day and returned tender first with a loaded train to Ana Maria. The loco left us to run light engine back to the mill to turn while we had a leisurely lunch in town.

In the afternoon no. 106 propelled a loaded train some distance back up the line towards Velez Malaga as far as a particularly photogenic bridge over a river, and then we made our way slowly back towards the mill with several photo stops en route. By now it was extremely hot and we were all relieved when an ice cream seller appeared at a remote junction, seemingly miles from anywhere, with copious supplies of mango ice cream. Really welcome! One of our wagons derailed soon after Ana Maria so we ditched the train and all clambered on board any available spaces on the loco and tender. Before long it was sunset. 

Next day we were up again well before dawn. Another brilliant sunny day - evidently God knew by now what was required! To save time we planned to meet the train a couple of miles out from the mill but things went wrong and we had a long wait before it came. We followed the line as far as Ana Maria again, this time concentrating on photography on the lower part of the route and returned to the mill by bus. Here it was plain that all was not well. Not only had the modern plant not been repaired but the old machinery had broken down as well and the mill was idle. Enormous queues of lorries waiting to deliver their cane had built up, stretching back for several miles, and on the railway loaded trains stood waiting at the loading points.

We set off in the afternoon along the Salamanca branch, supposedly to collect a loaded train but when we reached the terminus there was no stock to be seen at all. Presumably the cane cars had got out of sequence with the breakdown at the mill and no empties had been delivered there. We had no choice but to return light engine with just one empty car for us to ride. Close to the mill we were able to shunt some loaded cars at a loading point and took some good silhouette pictures as the sun set. It was dark by the time we returned to the mill. We had planned another attempt at night shots but fate struck and we derailed at the mill entrance. The photo shoot had to be abandoned though some of us managed a few pics of the breakdown crew at work rerailing the loco.

By way of a postscript this turned out to be the last season for the railway system at La Carlota. Within a few months of the season's end all the track had been lifted save for the factory yard, the haste being in order to bring to an end the wayleave dues payable to the farmers through whose land the lines had run.

BISCOM, Binalbagan

Friday, the last day of the trip and another brilliant sunny day. We had spent the night at a number of small hotels and guesthouses close to Binalbagan and set off for the BISCOM mill there early in time for the 6.30am departure of the loaded trains. BISCOM was formed in 1949 by the merger of the centrals at Binalbagan and at Isabela, some miles to the east. The combined company mills at Binalbagan which it has developed into one of the largest and most efficient operations on Negros.

This had been billed as a non-steam day. The Binalbagan company abandoned steam in the 1930's and the combined operation has been diesel worked for many years. Much of the rail system has been abandoned and the surviving sections are worked by a fleet of trim General Electric four-wheeled diesel electrics and a few four- and six- coupled Japanese machines. The mill's management had taken great care to make our visit as interesting as possible. We checked in promptly at the mill and at once were taken off into the fields where a cavalcade of two trains of empties, each followed by a breakdown train, was waiting for us at a level crossing. Once we were in position the four trains set off across the road and paused again at the next crossing for us to catch them up. Then it was back to the mill to watch shunting in progress in the yard. 

Here, to our surprise, we spotted no. 6, a long abandoned Baldwin 2-6-2T rusting away off the tracks, with every horizontal surface deep in soil and abundant growth all over the loco. So, this wasn't an all-diesel mill after all! The management seemed surprised that the derelict steam loco was attracting so much interest but soon got their men to cut back the undergrowth, shift the soil and make the loco ready to pose for its portraits. Nearby we could just make out the shape of a saddle tank peeping out above the bushes. More cutting back followed (thanks, Chris!) and slowly Davenport 0-4-0ST no. 28 reappeared. This loco owes its survival to its use for many years as a towed weed burner for which purpose its wheels and motion had been removed and replaced by wagon wheels. We were ushered into position to watch another train of empties setting off from the mill, given a quick tour of numerous derelict i/c locos at the depot and then treated to refreshments at the mill canteen, very welcome. We were presented with polo shirts as souvenirs before finishing our visit at a bridge over the river at the mill entrance to watch the loaded trains return. Altogether a most enjoyable visit.

SONEDCO, Kabankalan

It was only mid-morning as we left Binalbagan and we decided to press on to SONEDCO at Kabankalan, a few miles to the south. The railway there was abandoned in 2001. It had been a relatively small operation with only 20km of running line but had employed fourteen diesel locos in its heyday. We hadn't arranged a permit to visit but were welcomed in. We found the remains of two diesels. One was no. 14, a four-wheeled Hitachi, which consisted only of its frame and wheels and a part of its cab. The other had been completely dismantled above footplate level and was barely visible at all in the long grass. Next to them and relatively complete was a delightful vehicle, a railcar, probably home made and powered by a Jeep petrol engine, with an engine bonnet almost as long as its passenger compartment. We were told that the manager plans to restore it and to preserve it at the entrance to the mill. It would make a delightful model.

As we drove back to Bacolod we spotted a BISCOM train being shunted over a bridge on the outskirts of Binalbagan. Soon two trains slowly crossed the bridge, a delightful sight in the late afternoon sunshine with the mountains behind. A fitting end to a very successful trip.


Loco lists

These loco lists are far more Thomas Kautzor's work than mine. Compiling the lists for some of the mills has been rather a hit and miss affair and what follows is almost certainly incomplete. At many of the mills records for the acquisition of locos and stock were destroyed during the Second World War. Lists from the loco builders tend only to show the name of the import agents as the first purchaser and not the name of the mills which were the end purchasers. Because of the difficulties of identifying locos due to the absence of work plates and the amount of renumbering that has taken place I have listed separately the locomotives known to have been delivered and those that we saw during our visit. It has been difficult to identify any of the locos with certainty except for the few Japanese ones which still carry their builder's plates. I have also included the class names for the Plymouth locos where these are known with reasonable certainty. Any further input would be gratefully received!

Bacolod-Murcia Milling Co. (BMMC), Bacolod City (mill closed 1987)

 

Number

Wheel arrangement

Manufacturer

Builders no.

Year

Remarks

Steam locos

?

2-6-0

Alco (Cooke)

63140

1921

(a)

2

2-6-0

Alco (Cooke)

63141

1921

(b)

3

2-6-0

Alco (Cooke)

63142

1921

(c)

4

2-6-0

Alco (Cooke)

63145

1921

(d)

1

2-6-0

Alco (Cooke)

65334

1923

(e)

2

2-6-0

Alco (Cooke)

63335

1923

s/s

3

2-6-0

Alco (Cooke)

65786

1924

s/s

4

2-6-0

Alco (Cooke)

65787

1924

s/s

5

2-6-0

Alco (Cooke)

65930

1924

(f)

6

0-6-0T+T

Vulcan (USA)

s/s

7

0-6-0T+T

Vulcan (USA)

(g)

8

0-6-0T+T

Vulcan (USA)

s/s

Notes

Also at least one Plymouth and at least one Krupp i/c loco.

(a) To Ma-Ao as their no. 3 1924. Resold to La Carlota as their no. 109 1980.
(b) To Ma-Ao as their no. 4 1924.
(c) To Ma-Ao as their no. 1 1924. Resold to La Carlota as their no. 110 1980.
(d) To Ma-Ao as their no. 2 1924.
(e) Preserved at a Chevrolet dealership, Jaro Street, Iloilo, Panay, about 6km on the road to Roxas.
(f) To Ma-Ao as their no. 5.
(g) Preserved at the site of Bacolod Murcia Mill. May in fact be no. 6 renumbered and not the original no. 7

Central Azucarera de Bais (CAB), Tanjay

Number

Wheel arrangement

Manufacturer

Type

Builders no.

Year

Remarks

Steam locos

1

0-6-0

Baldwin

53630

1920

s/s

2

0-6-0

Baldwin

53631

1920

s/s

6

0-6-0ST

Baldwin

58780

1925

s/s

7

0-6-0

Baldwin

58779

1925

(a)

8

0-6-0

Baldwin

60251

1927

(b)

9

0-6-0

Henschel

20990

1928

s/s

Internal combustion locos

11?

0-6-0

Plymouth

WLA2

3689

1932

12?

0-6-0

Plymouth

WLA2

3690

1932

13?

0-6-0

Plymouth

JLCWA

5415

1949

14?

0-6-0

Plymouth

JLCWA

5416

1949

15?

0-6-0

Plymouth

JDTW

6395

1964

16?

0-6-0

Plymouth

JMD

6441

1964

17

0-6-0

Plymouth

JDTW

6596

1967

18

0-6-0

Plymouth

JDTW

6597

1967

19

0-6-0

Plymouth

JDTW

6598

1967

20

0-6-0

Plymouth

JDTW

6780

1970

21

0-6-0

Plymouth

JDTW

6784

1971

22

4 or 6w?

Plymouth

JDTW

7089

1975

23

4 or 6w?

Plymouth

JDTW

7090

1975

Present on 2/2/2007:

1

0-6-0

Plymouth

big (230 hp), seen in use

2

0-6-0

Plymouth

big (230 hp), seen in use

3

0-6-0

Plymouth

inside shed

4

0-6-0

Plymouth

seen in use

5

0-6-0

Plymouth

seen in use

6

0-6-0

Plymouth

serviceable at shed

7

0-6-0

Plymouth

seen in use

8

0-6-0

Plymouth

dismantled

9

0-6-0

Plymouth

under repair

10

0-6-0

Plymouth

seen in use

11?

0-6-0

Plymouth

derelict

12

0-6-0

Plymouth

seen in use

14

0-6-0

Plymouth

derelict

14/51

0-6-0

Plymouth

derelict inside shed

15

4w DM

Plymouth

inside shed

16

4w DM

Plymouth

in use (c)

17

4w DH?

?

o.o.u. at shed

18

4w DH?

?

o.o.u. at shed

--

4w DH?

?

o.o.u. at shed

Notes

There is considerable doubt about the identity of the i/c locos. On 28-2-2007 the group saw both no. 1's and no's 2, 4, 5, 7, 10 and 12. 0-6-0 no. 1 and no. 2 are 240hp locos and the other 0-6-0's are 120hp locos. Some renumbering of the diesels has taken place and some numbers do not correspond. It was not possible to record properly all the derelict diesels that the group saw. There were 3 4wDH, only two of which had numbers. They had markings in French on the instruments and gauges in the cabs. There were two locos numbered 14, both derelict. One of them also carried the number 51. Eight diesels are currently in use per shift.

Both the surviving steam locos carry the number 7. It seems possible that the plinthed loco may have been renumbered with the 'lucky number' 7.

(a) Preserved outside the mill, by the road.
(b) Dumped 1/2/2007
(c) Luka warehouses shunter, with Koppel plate (Koppel was the name of a USA dealer which had connections to the German firm)

Binalbagan-Isabela Sugar Co. (BISCOM), Binalbagan

Number

Wheel arrangement

Manufacturer

Type

Builders no.

Year

Remarks

Steam locos

1

0-4-0ST

Baldwin

53524

1920

(a)

2

0-4-0ST

Baldwin

53525

1920

(b)

3

0-6-0T

Vulcan (USA)

3011

1920

(c)

4

0-6-0T

Vulcan (USA)

3012

1920

(c)

5

0-6-0T

Vulcan (USA)

3013

1920

(d)

6

2-6-2T

Baldwin

57971

1924

(e)

2?

0-4-0ST

Davenport

2168

1929

(f)

Internal combustion locos

1

4w

GE

34418

1961

(g)

2

4w

GE

34419

1961

(g)

3

4w

GE

34420

1961

4

4w

GE

34421

1961

(g)

5

4w

GE

34422

1961

(h)

6

4w

GE

34423

1961

(g)

7

4w

GE

34424

1961

28

0-4-0

Hitachi

HR20B

12716

1963

29

0-4-0

Hitachi

HR20B

12717

1963

30

0-4-0

Hitachi

HR20B

12718

1963

(g)

33

0-6-0

Hitachi

HR25C

12812

1964

34

0-6-0

Hitachi

HR25C

12813

1964

?

0-6-0

Plymouth

WLA2

3124

1929

?

4w or 6w?

Plymouth

JLD2 or JCD?

3806

1935

?

4w

Plymouth

JLA

5404

1948

?

4w

Plymouth

JLA

5405

1948

?

4w

Plymouth

JLCA

5406

1949

?

4w

Plymouth

JLCA

5407

1949

?

4w

Plymouth

JLCA

5408

1949

?

4w

Plymouth

JLCA

5409

1949

?

4w

Plymouth

JLCA

5471

1949

?

4w

Plymouth

JLCA

5472

1949

?

4w

Plymouth

JLAA

5535

1950

?

4w or 6w?

Plymouth

JDTW

6213

1959

Present on 9/2/2007:

1

4w

GE

34418

1961

working

2

4w

GE

34419

1961

working

3

4w

GE

34420

1961

o.o.u.

4

4w

GE

34421

1961

working

5

4w

GE

34422

1961

derelict

6

4w

GE

34423

1961

working

7

4w

GE

34424

1961

8

4w

derelict

9

4w

Plymouth

derelict

10

4w

derelict

12

4w

derelict

14

0-6-0

derelict

15

4w

Plymouth

derelict

16

4w

derelict

17

4w

derelict

18

4w

derelict

19

4w

derelict

21

0-6-0

Plymouth

stored inside

23

4w

derelict

24

0-6-0

Hitachi

12751

1964

derelict

25

0-6-0

Hitachi

1964

stored inside

26

0-6-0

Hitachi

1964

working

27

0-6-0

derelict

28

0-6-0

Hitachi

12716?

1963?

derelict

29

0-4-0

Hitachi

HR20B

12717?

1963?

30

0-4-0

Hitachi

HR20B

12718?

1963?

working

31

0-4-0

Hitachi

derelict

32

0-6-0

33

4w

derelict

35

4w

derelict

??

4w

Plymouth

derelict

??

4w

derelict

??

4w

derelict

??

4w

derelict

??

4w

derelict

Railcars

1

4w

serviceable

4

4w

derelict

-

4w

derelict

Notes

(a) Ordered as Philippine Vegetable Oil no. 1. To La Carlota as their no. 5.
(b) Ordered as Philippine Vegetable Oil no. 2. Sold before 1939.
(c) Sold 1937.
(d) Sold 1932.
(e) Ex-Isabela. Derelict at Binalbagan 9-2-2007.
(f) Ex-Isabela. Latterly used as a towed flame thrower, wheels and motion removed and replaced with wagon wheels. It was difficult to decipher its number with certainty. Most probably the number reads 28 but possible alternatives are 2 or 26.
(g) Working 9-2-2007.
(h) Derelict at Binalbagan 9-2-2007.

Hawaiian-Philippine Co. (HPCo), now operates as Silay-Saravia Railways Coop. (SSR), Silay

Number, Name

Wheel arrangement

Manufacturer

Type

Builders no.

Year

Remarks

Steam locos

1

0-6-0

Baldwin

52198

1919

s/s

1 "C.W. Hines"

0-6-0

Henschel

21646

1929

(a)

2 "Peter Francis Davies"

0-6-0

Baldwin

52199

1919

(b)

3 "A.M. McKever"

0-6-0

Baldwin

52864

1920

(c)

4 "R.C. Pitcairn"

0-6-0

Baldwin

52865

1920

(c)

5 "Arthur W. Wood"

0-6-0

Baldwin

52866

1920

(d)

6 "J.A. McMaster"

0-6-0

Baldwin

52867

1920

(c)

7 "Edwin B. Herkes"

0-6-0

Baldwin

60677

1928

(e)

8 "David G. Semple"

0-6-0ST+T

Baldwin

16437

1900

(f)

9 "Douglas J. McCleod"

0-6-0ST+T

Baldwin

43246

1919

(g)

10

0-6-0ST+T

Baldwin

(h)

?

0-6-0

Henschel

19688

1923

s/s

Internal combustion locos

?

4w

Plymouth

JCD

5302

1948

15

4w

Plymouth

JCD

5303

1948

1

0-6-0

Plymouth

JCDW

5340

1948

2

0-6-0

Plymouth

JCDW

5341

1948

3

0-6-0

Plymouth

JCDW

5342

1948

(i)

?

0-6-0

Plymouth

JDTW

6198

1959

16

0-6-0

Plymouth

JDTW

6763

1970

11

4 or 6w?

Plymouth

JDTW

6988

1974

Present in 2/2007:

10

0-4-0

HPCo

derelict at crane (truck engine)

11

0-6-0

Plymouth

in use

12

0-6-0

Plymouth

in use

14

0-6-0

Plymouth

derelict

15

0-4-0

Plymouth

derelict

16

0-6-0

Plymouth

in use

17

0-6-0

Plymouth

in use

18

0-6-0

Plymouth

in use

Railcars

3

4w

derelict

4

4w

derelict

6

4w

in use

7 or 8

4w

derelict (carried both numbers)

-- (10)

bogie "shuttle car", derelict (k)

--

4w inspection trolley

stored in shed

Notes

(a) Ex-Lopez Sugar Corporation no. 3. Stored for sale 2/2007.
(b) Sold in about 2003 to California possibly to a private owner there
(c) Stored and advertised for sale 2/2007.
(d) Under repair 2/2007
(e) In working order 2/2007.
(f) Ex-Honolulu Sugar Corporation "Halawa". To Hawaiian-Phillipine 1949. Sold in about 2005 to the Kauai Plantation Railway at Kilohana, Hawaii and currently being restored in California. Originally an 0-6-2ST.
(g) Ex-Honolulu Sugar Corporation "Maņana". To Hawaiian-Phillipine 1949. Sold in about 2005 to the Kauai Plantation Railway at Kilohana, Hawaii and currently being restored in California. Originally an 0-6-2ST.
(h) Ex-Honolulu Sugar Co., ex-Kahuku Sugar Co. in 1948, ex-Honolulu Plantation Co. in 1944, s/s.
(i) To Lopez Sugar Corporation in exchange for Henschel 0-6-0 no. 1.
(k) formerly used to carry children from Mambag-Id at the western end of the harbour branch to and from school.

Central Azucarera de La Carlota (CAC), La Carlota

Number

Wheel arrangement

Manufacturer

Type

Builders no.

Year

Remarks

Steam locos

4

0-4-0T+T

H.K. Porter

4747?

1910?

(a)

5

0-4-0ST+T

Baldwin

53524

1920

(b)

6

0-4-0T+T

Davenport

1859

1921

(d)

100

0-6-0T+T

Baldwin

52436

1919

(c)

101

0-6-0T+T

Baldwin

53075

1920

(c)

102

0-6-0T+T

Baldwin

53076

1920

(c)

103

0-6-0T+T

Baldwin

53181

1920

(c)

104

0-6-0T+T

Baldwin

53536

1920

(c)

105

0-6-0T+T

Baldwin

58490

1925

(e)

106

0-6-0T+T

Baldwin

59268

1926

(f)

107

0-6-2ST+T

Baldwin

37810

1912

(c)

108

0-6-2ST+T

Baldwin

52937

1920

(g)

109

2-6-0T+T

Alco (Cooke)

63142

1921

(h)

110

2-6-0T+T

Alco (Cooke)

63140

1921

(i)

Internal Combustion locos

1

4w

Plymouth

JLCA

5475

1949

2

6w

Kisha Seiza Kaisha

2719

1951

3

4 or 6w?

Plymouth

JDTW

6278

1961

4

0-6-0

Plymouth

JDTW

6416

1964

5

0-6-0

Plymouth

JDTW

6437

1964

6

4 or 6w?

Plymouth

JDTW

6548

1966

7

4 or 6w?

Plymouth

JDTW

6556

1967

8

4 or 6w?

Plymouth

JDTW

6557

1967

9

0-6-0

Kyosan Kogyo

1970

10

0-6-0

Kyosan Kogyo

1970

11

0-6-0

Kyosan Kogyo

1970

Present in 2/2007:

1

4w

Plymouth

(j)

2

0-6-0

Kisha Seiza Kaisha

19

1951

(j)

3

0-6-0

Plymouth

(f)

4

0-6-0

Plymouth

(f)

5

0-6-0

Plymouth

(f)

6

0-6-0

Plymouth

(f)

7

0-6-0

Plymouth

(f)

8

0-6-0

Plymouth

(k)

9

0-6-0

Kyosan Kogyo

1970

(f)

10

0-6-0

Kyosan Kogyo

1970

(f)

11

0-6-0

Kyosan Kogyo

1970

(f)

Railcars

1

4w

stored/derelict

4

4w

serviceable

5

4w

serviceable

7

4w

serviceable

8

4w

serviceable (at Ana Maria)

Notes

(a) Preserved at the mill entrance.
(b) Ex-Binalbagan no. 1. Dumped at La Carlota 2/2007.
(c) Dumped at La Carlota 2/2007.
(d) Ex-Hacienda Hijos de La Rama, San Isidro, Negros. Preserved at Star City Amusement Park, Manila (previously at Tagaytay, Luzon and prior to that at the Sunshine Hotel, Paaralang, Luzon.).
(e) Preserved beside the main road about one mile west from La Carlota City.
(f) In working order 2/2007.
(g) Preserved at La Carlota Pavilion, Panaad Park & Sports Complex, Mansilingan, Bacolod.
(h) Originally Bacolod Murcia no. 1. To Ma-Ao as their no. 3 in 1924. To La Carlota 1980. Side tanks fitted at La Carlota. Dumped at La Carlota 2/2007.
(i) Originally Bacolod Murcia no. 3. To Ma-Ao as their no. 1 in 1924. To La Carlota 1980. Side tanks fitted at La Carlota. Dumped at La Carlota 2/2007.
(j) stored o.o.u. inside shed 2/2007.
(k) chassis stored inside shed, body destroyed in an accident when it fell into a river, killing the driver and his son.


Rob Dickinson

Email: webmaster@internationalsteam.co.uk